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Re: [vox] What is you opinion on having a Java EE talk for March?
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Re: [vox] What is you opinion on having a Java EE talk for March?



Let me preface this by saying that according to some web development communities, Java's niche seems to be enterprise web development by large teams. The reasons I hear (warning: possible stereotypes and faulty assumptions ahead!) are:

1) The language itself is limited and results in a lot of boilerplate code, requiring more development and maintenance time
2) Deployment requires powerful servers, tons of configuration, etc.
3) The apps use a lot of memory so many web hosts don't support it

It sounds like some of the libraries you've found might mitigate that and give people a reason to rethink Ruby on Rails or Django for their next app. In particular I'm really interested in how Java might benefit lone developers and small teams, either in terms of increased productivity or the security/stability/performance of the end product, and maybe a basic rundown of how to affordably launch a Java app.

-Eric

On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 4:44 PM, Brian Lavender <brian@brie.com> wrote:
I mean for March.

On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 04:28:49PM -0800, Brian Lavender wrote:
> At last night's meeting, I mentioned I could do a Java Web talk for February.
> What do you guys think about a Java EE talk for March?
>
> It seems that many favor python. While I think Python is great, I think there
> is a lot of wonderful stuff going with Java as far as doing web applications
> and the ultra wide application stuff with REST, security, EJBs, etc that you
> can do today. Netbeans and Glassfish are doing a lot of great stuff. And now
> with Java EE, you can dump much of that XML configuration stuff so many
> loathed with J2EE.
>
> What is your take?
>
> brian
> --
> Brian Lavender
> http://www.brie.com/brian/
>
> "There are two ways of constructing a software design. One way is to
> make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies. And the other
> way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies."
>
> Professor C. A. R. Hoare
> The 1980 Turing award lecture
> _______________________________________________
> vox mailing list
> vox@lists.lugod.org
> http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox

--
Brian Lavender
http://www.brie.com/brian/

"There are two ways of constructing a software design. One way is to
make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies. And the other
way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies."

Professor C. A. R. Hoare
The 1980 Turing award lecture
_______________________________________________
vox mailing list
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http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox

_______________________________________________
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http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox


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