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The following is an archive of a post made to our 'vox-tech mailing list' by one of its subscribers.

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RE: [vox-tech] strange network question
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RE: [vox-tech] strange network question



On Tue, 20 Feb 2001, Deja User wrote:

> Hey, Pete, from my limited experience 127.0.0.1 is the way to ping
> yourself.

Pinging 127.0.0.1 won't accomplish anything if you're trying to see if
your network card (209.233.102.35 in Pete's case) is working.

> I've never heard of pinging your won ip address any other
> way,

Whether you have a connection to the outside world, you should be able to
ping 127.0.0.1 since it's the loopback.

If you have one or more ethernet cards, you should be able to ping the IP
address of your card.

If you have a dialup connection, you should be able to ping the PPP
interface.

These are all ways to ping your computer because all these IP addresses
belong to your computer.

> Intuitively, to me at least, pinging your loopback
> (127.0.0.1) makes sense (down the stack, to the nic, back up the
> stack),

Pinging 127.0.0.1 does not go to the NIC.

-Mark

PS: BTW, Peter -- I don't think pinging 209.233.102.35 goes out then
comes back -- just see traceroute.  But if you have the system configured
to filter out all ICMP packets (via ipchains or whatnot) then you
wouldn't be able to ping your own network card, or so I'd think.

---
Mark K. Kim
http://www.cbreak.org/mark/
PGP key available upon request.


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