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RE: [vox-tech] request for help: cvs
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RE: [vox-tech] request for help: cvs



rusty, i have no concrete knowledge of what cvs is, but i'll tell you
everything that i *think* is true.


as i understand it, cvs is a way of organizing a programming project.

with a big project, like zworld's compiler, you always run the risk of 2
programmers working on the same file, which can lead to all sorts of
trouble.  undoing each other's work, putting in conflicting code, etc.
lots of stuff can go wrong.

there is one source code tree which is the "fiducial" or "cannonical" or
"autoritative" source code.   cvs manages this.   all the programmers
also have a copy of this source code tree on their hard drives, but this
is their own copy, and is not authoritative.  if they make changes to their
own code, nobody sees their changes.

cvs implements the notion of "checking out" a file.  once a programmer
checks out a file, nobody else can work on that file.  the programmer checks
the file out of cvs, makes his changes, and checks the file back in to the
authoritative tree.   once he checks the file back in, everybody can see his
changes (they need to update their tree) and other people can now work with
that file.

that solves the "two people working on the same file" problem.  cvs also
does other things.  i think it keeps track of who made what changes, so you
know who to fire for putting in the bug.

lastly, cvs maintains the source code in the form of an onion.  think about
the source code as being an onion, and every change that is made is another
"layer" of the onion.  if you find that you don't like a particular change,
you can always back the change out by peeling away the outer layer.  in
fact, you can go back to any previous version of the source code by peeling
off the correct number of layers.

the layers are maintained by diffs, not by backing up the code with every
change.  this is a great boon because then you can undo changes very easily,
go back to any previous version easily and not have 50 million copies of the
full source code.  saves on disk space.

cvs can also be accessed via the net.   if you look at the dvd-howto, it has
a paragraph or two devoted to the livid source code and how you can access
it through cvs.

this is basically all i know about cvs.  i'm hoping someone else can fill in
the details.   :)

pete


----------------------------------------------------------------   linux
To err is human, to forgive is divine.      p@belial.ucdavis.edu     _
To oink is porcine, to meow is feline.    http://www.dirac.org/p    ._.
To neigh is equine to howl is lupine,                               /v\
To moo is bovine to bleat is ovine.                                // \\
----------------------------------------------------------------   ^^ ^^
  The best way to accelerate a win95 system is at 9.81 m/s^2       rules

On Mon, 9 Oct 2000, Roland Minden wrote:

> Being new I can ask silly questions. What is cvs?
> Rusty
> 
> ------Original Message------
> From: Peter Jay Salzman <p@belial.ucdavis.edu>
> To: vox-tech@lists.lugod.org
> Sent: October 9, 2000 4:46:19 PM GMT
> Subject: [vox-tech] request for help: cvs
> 
> 
> dear all,
> 
> it's high time that i learn how to use cvs.  the man page is hopeless, and
> the CVS howto is a duplicate of the CVS-RCS howto, which is mostly a bunch
> of scripts to convert RCS stuff to CVS (it looks like it anyway).  i think
> this might be a mistake on either debian's or ldp's end?!?
> 
> could some kind soul write a short, quick and dirty quickstart for CVS for
> me?  something in the spirit of my own linux tutorials, located at:
> 
> www.dirac.org/p/linux/linux_index.html
> 
> with your permission, i'd like to put it on my website too.
> 
> -----------------
> 
> btw, if i don't have access to the server config files, how can i make a
> directory like
> 
> www.dirac.org/p/linux
> 
> point to a file like
> 
> www.dirac.org/p/linux/inux_index.html
> 
> pete
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------   linux
> To err is human, to forgive is divine.      p@belial.ucdavis.edu     _
> To oink is porcine, to meow is feline.    http://www.dirac.org/p    ._.
> To neigh is equine to howl is lupine,                               /v\
> To moo is bovine to bleat is ovine.                                // \\
> ----------------------------------------------------------------   ^^ ^^
> The best way to accelerate a win95 system is at 9.81 m/s^2       rules
> 
> 
> ........................................................ 
> iWon.com       http://www.iwon.com     why wouldn't you? 
> ........................................................
> 
> 


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